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Keep your plate full with succession sowing

Keep your plate full with succession sowing

Some vegetables are too eager. They race for maturity, but deteriorate if not picked, leaving you to eat a season’s quota of your favourite crop in one go.

Just too many radish.

The trick is staggering harvest times by sowing seeds little and often in ‘succession’.

You can keep your plate evenly full by growing young plants to replace those that have just vanished into the kitchen.

Crops suited to succession sowing:

Busy sowing

Impatient crops that have an ideal maturity and don’t store well. These chaps will sulk if not harvested, usually producing seeds or losing tenderness, so are best sown regularly.

For example (links open Garden Organic PDFs): Annual Spinach, Broad Bean, Leaf Beet, Calabrese, Carrot, Cabbage, Kohl Rabi, Lettuce, Pea, Radish, Rocket, Salad Onion, Turnip, Swede, Summer Salads, and Seed Sprouts.

Crops less is need of succession sowing:

Generous crops that can’t resist yielding for long periods, such as tomatoes and runner beans. These crops are best sown once. Likewise crops that like to culminate their season at about the same time every year, such as pumpkins and squashes.

Weather can ruin the best laid horticultural plans

A hot or cold spell can excite or depress crops sown at different times, letting them catch up with one another. So, a couple of useful tips to help buffer the effects of surprise weather:

  • Rather than follow a rigid sowing schedule – with new carrots every third Sunday, wait for the earlier sowing to grow merrily before sowing again.
  • Pick crops early, munching young plants as ‘thinnings’, leaving alternate plants to grow larger.
  • Speed up slower specimens by covering with a cloche or horticultural fleece for a couple of weeks. This will get them growing!

Going further

Succession sowing can continue for several months depending on the crop and, more and more, clever new varieties. Have a look at the Organic Gardening Catalogue.

Don’t feel obliged to grow young plants next to old so they compete in rows, or entertain large bare spaces with the promise of late season sowings…  So long as there are crops of different age around your growing space, then local tableware will be pleased.

Just after the thrill of eating own-grown produce, is experimenting with different veg at different harvest times. I find succession sowing, with the many caveats, one of most exciting of all horticultural delights.

Did you know that Garden Organic publishes a wondrous array of growing tips?

Click here to discover unusual crops (opens ‘Sowing New Seed’ project website)

Step by step growing activities…

Become a Garden Organic member…

What to do in the garden in June and July

Lively growing blogs by volunteer Master Gardeners:
Warwickshire, North London, South London, Norfolk, and Lincolnshire

Article by Philip Turvil

Posted in Featured, Growing tips, Vegetables0 Comments

Ideal for new growers & households: Grow your own Veg course launches online

Ideal for new growers & households: Grow your own Veg course launches online

Working with leading on-line course providers Love to Learn, Garden Organic is excited to present a new way to learn the joys of growing your own Veg.

What’s more, every booking made through the Garden Organic web link ensures a 10% donation of the course fee goes to supporting the charities projects.

Recommended for householders mentored by Master Gardeners.

 

What is the course about?

Want to pick your own fresh peas and taste home-grown organic tomatoes? Start from the basics on growing your own vegetables in your own garden or allotment. Learn the important stages and cycles of growing veg, and acquire new skills for sowing and reaping a harvest of fresh, seasonal, organic veg.

Take the course now

Is this the right course for me?

You value the idea of healthy, seasonal, self-sufficient eating and want to start making a difference in an enjoyable, organic way.

Why should I choose this course?

· Learn to grow your own vegetables with this beginner’s course.
· From planning your plot to harvesting your results, Grow your Own Veg will teach you the basics of growing the most popular vegetables, with lots of practical advice and tips.
· Follow the easy step-by-step process featuring How-to videos with Bob Sherman, your expert tutor and Garden Organic’s Chief Horticultural Officer.

How will I learn?

· Start the course at any time of the year as there is always something to do or to plan.
· Get advice and tips from your tutor, Bob Sherman, Garden Organic’s Chief Horticultural Officer, and former presenter of Channel 4’s gardening programme ‘All Muck and Magic’.
· Work at your own pace to suit your gardening needs.
· Enjoy an estimated of 10 to 12 hours of online learning plus your gardening activities.
· Make your own notes in your personal workbook.
· Learn from the comfort of your own home, or out on your patch with a mobile device.

What will I study?

· Course Introduction
· Unit 1: Grow It Yourself
· Unit 2: Planning and Preparing
· Unit 3: Know Your Veg
· Unit 4: Late Winter/Early Spring
· Unit 5: Late Spring/Early Summer
· Unit 6: Late Summer/Early Autumn
· Unit 7: Late Autumn/Early Winter

Take the course now

About Love to Learn

Love to Learn is part of Pearson, the world’s leading learning company. Pearson provides learning materials and services to people in over 70 countries and is home to Penguin, Dorling Kindersley and the Financial Times.

User reviews

“Bob is excellent, like a favourite uncle; good tips, I’d feel confident to start.”
Dennis
“Very good starting point, it gives you confidence to get out and try it, very good instructions and record-keeping tips.”
Lee
“I like the bits you can’t do by using a book, the activities and immediate feedback.”
Fiona
“It’s very clear, easy to follow, and the overall feeling is one of support �“ there’s not a ‘right or wrong’ tone to the course.”
Charlotte

Visit Garden Organic’s website

Back to Master Gardeners

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News: Local food charity looking for Somerset Master Gardeners to support people to grow their own food

News: Local food charity looking for Somerset Master Gardeners to support people to grow their own food

Local food charity, [1] Somerset Community Food are pleased to announce that they will be partnering with national charity [2] Garden Organic to support volunteers in Somerset to become Master Gardeners to help get their communities growing their own food.

“Around the country, thousands of people have been supported to grow their own with the help of 400 Master Gardeners, and now is the time to get Somerset skilled up to grow their own!”, says Linda Hull who is co-ordinating the project.

“The programme works by offering individuals and communities free advice and mentoring. The idea is to enthuse people about food growing whilst offering the support that they need along the journey.”

Get involved

The charity is looking for volunteers with at least two years food growing experience that can help other families and households to start growing their own as well as promote food growing to their community at events, talks, via projects and more.

Volunteers offer half a day per month or 30 hours over the year and get additional training in growing techniques. The induction training begins in March and applications are welcome as soon as possible.

Now is the time to get Somerset skilled up to grow their own. Read about the proven benefits for volunteers and the people they mentor.

Now recruiting Somerset Master Gardeners for induction training in March 2013

Please click here to get in touch with co-ordinators, Linda & Nicole to discuss the volunteer role and application.

Or email info@somersetcommunityfood.org.uk or visit http://www.incredible-edible-somerset.ning.com/page/master-gardeners

Notes for editors

  1. Somerset Community Food are a local charity founded in 2004, which aims to re-connect people with the social, health and environmental effects of growing, buying, preparing and eating local food.
  2. Garden Organic, the UK’s leading organic growing charity, has been at the forefront of the organic horticulture movement for 50 years. Dedicated to promoting organic gardening in homes, communities and schools, it uses innovation and inspiration to get more people growing in the most sustainable way. 
Garden Organic’s charitable work delivers the organic growing message through renowned projects such as the Food For Life Partnership, the Master Composter and Master Gardener schemes and the work of The Heritage Seed Library. To find out more visit http://www.gardenorganic.org.uk
  3. For a high-quality photographs to accompany this article, please email nicole.vosper@somersetcommunityfood.org.uk with your request and deadline.

Back to Master Gardener news

Become a Master Gardener in spring 2013 with Garden Organic

Master Gardener Joe swapping top tips with food growers

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How to grow your seed potatoes

How to grow your seed potatoes

Now is the time to celebrate the spud with Garden Organic’s National Potato day on the 26 and 27 January 2013 and other themed events this month around the UK.

 

 

 

 

Wake up your new seed-potatoes by ‘chitting’. This gives the keenest start.

  • Pop your seed-potatoes in a clean egg box ‘rose’ end up – the end with most buds.
  • Label the variety. Most spuds look similar to start with!
  • Put the egg box in a cool light place for four to six weeks.
  • The potatoes will grow sturdy green shoots ready to offer an earlier harvest.

Keen growers choosing choosing their seed potatoes at Ryton Gardens

Chitting tips

  • Keep your young spuds out of very bright sunlight – although not too dark, otherwise pale brittle shoots develop that easily break.
  • Chit potatoes that are already sprouting straight away. Otherwise leave in a cool, dark place until you are ready to chit them.
  • Plant your chitted spuds 15cm deep. Space ‘early’ varieties 30-50cm apart from mid-March for a June-July harvest. Space ‘maincrop’ varieties 35-70cm apart from April for a September-October harvest.

Potato growing advice

See below for potato growing instructions (scrolling PDF)
Click here for advice choosing varieties from Master Gardeners (opens webpage)
Click here to read about growing potatoes in containers (opens PDF)
Click here to read about growing potatoes no-dig (opens PDF)

Find out about Garden Organic’s National Potato day

Growing instructions for potato

Written by Philip Turvil, Project Manager for Master Gardener Programme

More growing advice

More about Master Gardener programme

Posted in Featured, Growing tips, Vegetables0 Comments

Seed saving spreads after Garden Organic training

Seed saving spreads after Garden Organic training

Heritage Seed Library’s Seed Officer, Vicki Cooke, delivered a series of engaging and thought-provoking day-long training courses for Master Gardeners during November 2012.

Local venues played host to the dissection of flowers from brassicas, identification of pollination methods, and practical seed preparation. This was all towards learning techniques for helping the households and shared growing spaces supported by Master Gardeners to save their own seeds.

 

Feedback from volunteer Master Gardeners

“The training was amazing, well presented and interactive. Also it was great to see familiar faces and hear their stories. Lunch was deliciousssssss… the packets of seeds and the garlic, most appreciated. Thank you.”

“Vicki was tremendous, a brilliant tutor. I am really inspired to spread the message about seed saving for sustainable London crops!”

Read top growing tips

Saving seed is an exciting and money-saving way to complete the growing cycle. It lets you preserve your favourite fruit or vegetable varieties to grow again next year or swap with friends – a great way to get others growing.

Anybody can save seed and for beginners, the best crops to start with are peas, French beans and tomatoes. Read guidelines here.

Some of the highlights of learning for those who came along:

“As many seeds have good longevity, if you want to grow for seed, you don’t need to do it every year.  You can concentrate on a particular crop one year and a different one the next.”

“Finding out a lot more about veg that cross pollinate was fascinating and with limited space, I’ll take greater care over the variety(ies) grown of those plants where I intend to collect seed.”

“Leave your tomato seeds on the paper towel when you are drying them – just plant the seeds still attached to the paper in spring”

“Most commercial seeds are produced abroad”

“I’m going to introduce a seed swap”

“I spent my sunny morning reading the handout and my notes about why and how of seed saving. I’m feeling more confident about it now, I already have the tomatillo seeds in water to remove the gel.”

For more information on seed saving, go to the Heritage Seed Library.

Connect with your local Master Gardener.

Read the latest case studies of food-growing across the Master Gardener Programme.

Enthusiastic Vicki with seeds from Heritage Seed Library

 

All in – dry seed processing

Annuals, inbreeders, exceptions – Master Gardener work out what’s what

Vicki’s feet took part in the training!

How Terry saves seeds!

From MG Carole Wright – sorting out what’s what of seed saving – how many can you guess…?

See more photos on Flickr

 

 

Posted in Case studies, Featured0 Comments

Local Food heroes – WINNERS

Local Food heroes – WINNERS

Master Gardeners John and Sandy Young have won the Local Food heroes in the West Midlands!

John and Sandy Young beat all their competitors to be named West Midlands Local Food Heroes 2012.

On Wednesday, December 5, they were presented with their award by Alex Boys of the Big Lottery and Marc Lupson from Local Food.

 

Garden Organic’s Master Gardener Programme received a £459,709 grant from Local Food in 2009 to develop a practical model for a volunteer support network in Warwickshire and elsewhere to support people and communities to grow fruit and vegetables in their gardens and on local communal land.

Kate Newman, Warwickshire Volunteer Coordinator at the Master Gardener Programme, nominated John and Sandy jointly for an award in the summer because of their dedication to the project, as well as their passion, reliability, and ability to enthuse others about food growing. Kate said:

“John and Sandy have endless enthusiasm and passion to help others discover the benefits of growing their own food, and we are thrilled they have been recognised as Local Food Heroes.”

John and Sandy proudly display their trophy with Alex Boys from the Big Lottery and Marc Lupson from Local Food (right)

Working as a team, and with many years of gardening experience and composting knowledge between them, John and Sandy help with local school gardening clubs and attend events, as well as running a regular stall at Rugby Farmers’ Market, where they offer advice and support to local people. They give talks, run workshops and question time sessions, encouraging people to grow food at home – no matter how small a space they have to grow in.

Over the past two years, they have clocked up more than 600 hours of volunteering, and have supported more than 30 households to grow their own – offering young plants, demonstrating gardening techniques and helping new growers to make a success of their vegetable plots.

John and Sandy, who have been members of Garden Organic for 25 years, were initially shortlisted by a Local Food panel, and then competed jointly against two other West Midlands finalists in a public vote to decide the winner. Thousands of people across the country voted for a Local Food Hero, in one or more regions of England, by visiting the Local Food website.

Mark Wheddon, Local Food Programme Manager, said:

“Since we opened the Local Food programme in 2008, we’ve heard many wonderful anecdotes about the fantastic contribution that members of the community are making to ensure the success of their local projects. So we decided to celebrate and recognise some of these unsung heroes by encouraging projects to nominate the ordinary people doing extraordinary things.

“We had a great response, and are delighted to present John and Sandy with this very well-deserved award. They are true Local Food Heroes, an inspiration to others and champions of the benefits of food growing. It is thanks to individuals like these that our projects are going beyond the aim of making local food more accessible and affordable, and are building community capacity across England.”

Chris Worman, of Ruby Borough Council, said:

“John and Sandy are not only Master Gardeners but also Master Composters and I class them as ‘local ambassadors’ who are always happy to assist others in the growing of local, organically produced food. It is my pleasure to support and congratulate John and Sandy on this very well earned recognition of their enthusiasm and passion for their volunteering.”

There is even a video to watch!
Watch a video about John and Sandy

 

Alex Boys from the Big Lottery with Kate Newman, Volunteer co-ordinator

John and Sandy Young with their Local Food heroes trophy

 

Find out Master Gardener Adam lee has been helping his household!

Become a Master Gardener

Find a Master Gardener

Posted in Featured, News0 Comments

Families celebrate harvests with Master Gardeners

Families celebrate harvests with Master Gardeners

We spent October celebrating harvests with households mentored to grow their own food by Garden Organic Master Gardeners. What a delight.

We hosted special events in Warwickshire, Norfolk and London for families and volunteers to share their growing successes and discuss the weather!

We’re really pleased with these autumn events following our lively events in spring launching the growing season with hundreds of growers.

See photos & more from our autumn 2012 harvest celebrations

     
Norfolk households celebrate their harvest of 2012 London harvest festival
and food
Apple-tastic
in Warwickshire

 

Read how ‘Grow your own food’ is a boost for health and sense of community, says Coventry University research.

More case studies

More news

Read about Garden Organic

Posted in Case studies, Featured0 Comments

What to do in November: food growing space

What to do in November: food growing space

As falling leaves smother fruit and veg crops, it’s a lovely time of year for quick outdoor jobs.

There are broad bean seeds to push in this month for a earlier crop in 2013. Although wait until February if your soil is already sodden. Read more growing tips here and visit the Organic Gardening Catalogue to admire their tempting varieties.

Garlic is worth reaching for your coat this month. They like the winter cold to properly develop next year. Select varieties for UK growing, splitting bulbs into individual ‘cloves’ for planting. Read more growing tips here.

What else?

Indoors, pea shoots are magic, where young seedlings on windowsills offer a nutritious snack from a small compost-filled tray. Read top tips here from our Master Gardener Alice.

And it’s a great time for seed sprouts such as mung bean and alfalfa. In a matter of days, damp seeds in a room-temperature jar offer delicious sandwich and stir-fry fillers. Read about seed sprouts here (links opens PDF).

Autumn cold protection: race against time.

What else  to do in the garden now: Garden Organic Guide.

November summary (links open PDFs)

 Plant Sow broad beans and garlic.
Lettuce
(under protection like cloches).
Fruit trees and bushes. Read Garden Organic’s free fruit manual here.
 Grow Insulate greenhouse and polytunnels from frost with bubble plastic.
Stake Brussels sprouts and kale; pull up soil around stems to lesson ‘wind-rock’.
Protect cauliflowers by snapping and folding leaves over flower heads (‘curds’).
Prune black and redcurrants and gooseberry bushes. Use suitable prunings as hardwood cuttings. Click here for how…
Put out food and water for birds. Read more here with RSPB.
 Eat Annual spinach, Brussels sprouts, winter and savoy cabbage, Jerusalem artichoke, kohl rabi, leaf beet, leek, lettuce, parsnip, salsify, swede, turnip.
 Others Drop hints for gardening vouchers as Christmas presents from friends and family.

Since the odd weather continues, my October summary too (links open PDFs)

 Plant In mild regions, sow broad beans, plant garlic, bulb onion, rhubarb.
Indoors, sow radish, autumn and winter salad, pea.
 Grow Collect fallen leaves to rot down to make ‘leafmould’. Click here for instructions…
Cut fruited canes of hybrid berries to ground level. Read Garden Organic’s free fruit manual here.
Cover bean plants with horticultural fleece to extend cropping.
 Eat Beetroot, carrot, Chiness cabbage, cauliflower, celery, kohl rabi, leaf beet.
Parsnip
and Brussels sprouts after frosty weather has improved flavour.
 Others  What are you still eating? Email me here to let me know!

Garden Organic’s growing resources

Click here to discover unusual crops

Step by step growing activities…

Become a Garden Organic member…

Lively growing blogs by volunteer Master Gardeners:
Coventry & Warwickshire, North London, South London, Norfolk, and Lincolnshire

Article by Philip Turvil

Posted in Featured, Fruit, Growing tips, Vegetables0 Comments

‘Grow your own food’ a boost for health and sense of community, says Coventry University research

‘Grow your own food’ a boost for health and sense of community, says Coventry University research

Encouraging people to grow more of their own food is not only beneficial to the environment but leads to improved health and wellbeing and creates stronger local communities, according to new Coventry University research released today.

In a study of the Master Gardeners programme run by the UK’s leading organic growing charity, Garden Organic, researchers at Coventry University’s Centre for Agroecology and Food Security (CAFS) and the Centre for Sustainable Regeneration (SURGE) found that those involved enjoyed an increased sense of community and improved life satisfaction, as well as having a significant impact on their food growing and consumption habits.

Through this new mentoring programme, Garden Organic recruited, trained and supported more than 400 volunteers in five areas – North London, South London, Lincolnshire, Norfolk and Warwickshire – to become Master Gardeners.

These volunteers, aged 16-81, then worked with their local community to encourage more people to grow food. As part of their commitment volunteers then recruit 10 households to mentor in horticulture for a year.

The Coventry University research found evidence of real behaviour change as the majority of both volunteers and households grew more food and a greater range of food after joining the programme. 63% of volunteers and 79% of households have increased the amount of food they grow, and as a result a quarter of households and a third of volunteers were able to reduce the amount they spent on food each week.

A third of mentored households now report spending 3-5 hours a week growing their own food, with a further 50% giving it a go for 1-2 hours a week. It is not just the households that are learning more about growing food; over 95% of both volunteers and households say they have increased their knowledge about food growing through involvement with Master Gardeners.

As a programme built around a network of local volunteers, the Coventry University researchers were keen to explore any possible impact on community. 94% of volunteers said that they felt part of a community, with two thirds saying their sense of community had increased since being involved in the Master Gardeners programme. And the average life satisfaction scores for both Master Gardener volunteers and households has increased; from 7.4 out of 10 to 8.4 amongst volunteers, 7.2 to 7.8 amongst households.

Families are now growing their own

Dr Moya Kneafsey, a researcher in CAFS and part of the University’s Grand Challenge Initiative in Sustainable Agriculture and Food Security, said: “For many years we’ve been told anecdotally that gardening is good for you as well as good for the environment. What these results show is how significant the impact can be in terms of health perceptions, life satisfaction and involvement in the local community. It also highlights just how important volunteering organisations and networks are in creating stronger, more engaged communities regardless of whether this is in an inner-city borough or a rural county.”

Philip Turvil, project manager for the Master Gardeners programme at Garden Organic, said: “We have always felt that our Master Gardeners programme has wide-reaching benefits beyond growing food. It’s also about lifestyle, community and improving the environment. We don’t want to just teach our Master Gardener volunteers the best way of growing a cabbage, we want to teach them how to pass this information on to others in their community, to share their passion and experience so that everyone is learning from each other and feeling the benefits. The outcomes of this research show us that this approach is working. By working with volunteers in their communities we’re proving that the initial challenges of growing your own food can be overcome. So if that first crop ends up slug eaten, rather than feel demoralised people look for advice and support instead of giving up.”

The Garden Organic Master Gardeners programme is supported by the Big Lottery Fund’s Local Food Scheme, Sheepdrove Trust and local authorities.

http://www.mastergardeners.org.uk

-ENDS-

For more information please contact Hannah Murray on 01727 737997 or email hannah@communicationsmanagement.co.uk.

Notes to Editors

Garden Organic Master Gardeners programme

Since its inception in April 2010 the Master Gardeners programme has overseen 44,608 food growing conversations, supported 560 community events and mentored 1,834 households (4,053 individuals including 1,387 under 16s). More than 15,000 volunteer hours have been given to communities in North London, South London, Norfolk, Lincolnshire and Warwickshire. Garden Organic has trained 449 volunteers and seen an 82% volunteer retention rate. The programme is supported by the Big Lottery Fund’s Local Food Scheme, Sheepdrove Trust and local authorities. The Master Gardeners programme was devised around the model of another successful scheme also led by Garden Organic, Master Composters.

http://www.mastergardeners.org.uk

Garden Organic

Garden Organic, the UK’s leading organic growing charity, has been at the forefront of the organic horticulture movement for 50 years. Dedicated to promoting organic gardening in homes, communities and schools, it uses innovation and inspiration to get more people growing in the most sustainable way. Garden Organic’s charitable work delivers the organic growing message through renowned projects such as the Food for Life Partnership, the Master Composter and Master Gardener schemes and the work of The Heritage Seed Library.

http://www.gardenorganic.org.uk

Local Food Scheme

Local Food is a £57.5 million programme that distributes money from the Big Lottery Fund (BIG) to a variety of food-related projects to help make locally grown food accessible and affordable. It was developed by a consortium of 15 national environmental organisations, and is managed on their behalf by the Royal Society of Wildlife Trusts (RSWT).

http://www.localfoodgrants.org

Coventry University

The research was undertaken by Dr Moya Kneafsey from Coventry University’s Centre for Agroecology and Food Security (CAFS), the research centre which is responsible for the Sustainable Agriculture and Food Security Grand Challenge Initiative strand of activity which examines how to create resilient food systems on a worldwide basis. In order to tackle this challenge head on CAFS recognises that solutions lie not only in the development of sustainable production technologies but are also concerned with the stability of food supplied and of communities themselves, the means by which people obtain food and aspects of governance, ethics and human behaviour.

The research was supported by Elizabeth Cheese at Coventry University’s Centre for Sustainable Regeneration (SURGE). Research at SURGE focuses on bringing the social and economic aspects of regeneration together, helping society to achieve a more equal, just and sustainable society for the future.

The findings presented here were based on 215 questionnaires, 29 face-to-face interviews and 8 focus groups.

http://wwwm.coventry.ac.uk/researchnet/cafs/Pages/cafs.aspx

 

Master Gardeners help local communities grow and share their own food

Posted in Case studies, Featured0 Comments

Master Gardeners help 48,000 people grow their own food

Master Gardeners help 48,000 people grow their own food

Garden Organic volunteers have helped over 44,000 people and mentored another 4,000 householders to grow food since April 2010.

The 449 trained Master Gardeners have volunteered an amazing 15,000 hours offering free food growing advice and support in central London boroughs and three rural counties.

Every Master Gardener finds and encourages local residents and groups to start growing – and keep growing through the highs and lows of fruit and veg.

Master Gardeners networks: April 2010 to August 2012

Growing their own

  • 15,024 volunteer hours helping people grow food
  • 82% (368) volunteer retention across five networks
  • 4,053 people in 1,834 mentored households (1,387 under 16). All growing their own. Families and schools; windowsills and allotments. Whatever the weather
  • 44,608 food growing conversations. Each one counts
  • 560 community groups/events supported. Thoroughly enjoyable

Behind the numbers:

Inspiring new growers

More details

Volunteers are locally recruited and trained by co-ordinators managed by the UK’s leading organic growing charity, Garden Organic.

Meet the team.

These lively networks are supported by the Big Lottery Fund’s Local Food Scheme, Sheepdrove Trust, and local authorities in Warwickshire, North London, South London and Norfolk. Together with the NHS in Lincolnshire.

Read about future areas.

Many, many thanks to all the Master Gardeners for sharing their knowledge and inspiring stories.

 

The future

Garden Organic is working with partnership organisations to establish custom networks of volunteer Master Gardeners in areas where there is the local need and local funding. All our models help people benefit from growing.

It’s very exciting. Read more here  or find ways to get involved with your nearest network.

With many thanks,

Philip

Philip Turvil
Project Manager, Master Gardener Programme, Garden Organic, Coventry, CV8 3LG

Fresh from Garden Organic training; volunteer Master Gardeners looking for new food growers

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  • How are your grafts going? Posted on 7 June 2016
    For those Breckland Master Gardeners and Norfolk Master Composters who attended the grafter’s course in February, can you let me know how things are progressing? It seems that qu...
  • Gooseberry – Size and Picking Posted on 7 June 2016
    Well now’s the time to decide big ones or little ones, or should I say fewer, but bigger? For there is always that choice to make when growing fruit you can have lots of littlies...
  • Could you be a Growing Buddy? Posted on 22 May 2016
    Now launching an exciting new volunteering opportunity in Breckland! We are recruiting volunteer ‘Growing Buddies’ to join our current network in Breckland. Growing Buddies...
  • Debbie Chessum Posted on 20 October 2015
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  • Heather Lowe Posted on 20 October 2015
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  • Spreading the organic growing message….. Posted on 2 September 2015
    I have lots of visitors to my allotment, some want to come and share tea and biscuits with me in my shed, some laze in deckchairs, some swap allotment tips while others stay for lo...
  • Forward Footing on Allotment 17b Posted on 26 August 2015
    On Monday 24 August I hosted a Wellbeing funded art project on my allotment! I was pleased that several members of Dementia Support South Lincolnshire attended, along with several ...
  • Lincolnshire Master Gardeners at Big Boston Festival Posted on 17 July 2015
    I was asked to make some creative interventions for the BBG festival site for the weekend of 4/5 July and also provide some activities on the day….I asked MG Tracy of Boston ...
  • Welcome to Somerset Master Gardeners Posted on 21 November 2012
      Garden Organic is delighted to announce our partnership with Somerset Community Food to support volunteer ‘Master Gardeners’ to help communities grow their own f...
  • A fresh start Posted on 11 November 2014
      Trying to beat a drug addiction is a huge challenge. Trying to detox whilst serving a prison sentence can be even more complex. But sometimes the simple things in life can h...
  • Blogs coming soon Posted on 9 February 2013
    Our programme at HMP Rye Hill begins in spring 2013. Please visit back soon for latest blogs. In the meantime, please click here to read Master Gardener blogs from across the UK Ab...
  • Case studies coming soon Posted on 9 February 2013
    Our programme at HMP Rye Hill begins in spring 2013. Please visit back soon for latest case studies. In the meantime, please click here to read case studies from our Master Gardene...
We’re creating a model to establish custom networks of volunteer Master Gardeners in more UK areas. More information available here.

Photos on flickr